Protection From Discrimination

Protection From Discrimination On The Grounds Of Race, Sex Etc.

PROTECTION FROM DISCRIMINATION ON THE GROUNDS OF RACE, SEX ETC

14.- 1. Subject to the provisions of subsections (4), (5) and (7) of this section, no law shall make any provision that is discriminatory either of itself or in its effect.

2. Subject to the provisions of subsections (6), (7) and (8) of this section, no person shall be treated in a discriminatory manner by any person acting by virtue of any law or in the performance of the functions of any public office or any public authority.

3. In this section, the expression "discriminatory" means affording different treatment to different persons attributable wholly or mainly to their respective descriptions by race, place of origin, political opinions or affiliations, colour, creed, or sex whereby persons of one such description are subjected to disabilities or restrictions to which persons of another such description are not made subject or are accorded privileges or advantages that are not accorded to persons of another such description.

4. Subsection (1) of this section shall not apply to any law so far as the law makes provision-

a. for the appropriation of public revenues or other public funds;

b. with respect to persons who are not citizens; or

c. whereby persons of any such description as in mentioned in subsection (3) of this section may be subjected to any disability or restriction or may be accorded any privilege or advantage that, having regard to its nature and to special circumstances pertaining to those persons or to persons of any other such description, is reasonably justifiable in a democratic society.

5. Nothing contained in any law shall be held to be inconsistent with or in contravention of subsection (1) of this section to the extent that it makes provision with respect to qualifications (not being qualifications specifically relating to race, place of origin, political opinions or affiliations, colour, creed or sex) for service as a public officer or as a member of a disciplined force or for the service of a local government authority or a body corporate established by any law for public purposes.

6. Subsection (2) of this section shall not apply to anything that is expressly or by necessary implication authorized to be done by any such provision of law as is referred to in subsection (4) or (5) of this section.

7. Nothing contained in or done under the authority of any law shall be held to be inconsistent with or in contravention of this section to the extent that that law in question makes provision whereby persons of any such description as in mentioned in subsection (3) of this section may be subjected to any restriction on the rights and freedoms guaranteed by sections 8, 10, 11, 12 and 13 of this Constitution, being such a restriction as is authorized by paragraph (a) or (b) of subsection (3) of section 8, subsection (2) of section 10, subsection (4) of section 11, subsection (4) of section 12 or subsection (2) of section 13, as the case may be.

8. Nothing in subsection (2) of this section shall affect any discretion relating to the institution, conduct or discontinuance of civil or criminal proceedings in any court that is vested in any person by or under this Constitution or any other law.

Constitution of Antigua

1. The State and its Territory
2. Constitution is Supreme Law
3. Fundamental Rights and Freedoms of the Individual
4. Protection of Right to Life
5. Protection of Right to Personal Liberty
6. Protection from Slavery and Forced Labour
7. Protection from Inhuman Treatment
8. Protection of Freedom of Movement
9. Protection from Deprivation of Property
10. Protection of Person Or Property from Arbitrary Search Or Entry
11. Protection of Freedom of Conscience
12. Protection of Freedom of Expression Including Freedom of the Press
13. Protection of Freedom of Assembly And Association
14. Protection from Discrimination On the Grounds of Race, Sex Etc.
15. Provision to Secure Protection of the Law
16. Derogations from Fundamental Rights And Freedoms Under Emergency Powers
17. Protection of Persons Detained-under Emergency Laws
18. Enforcement of Protective Provisions
19. Protection from Derogations from Fundamental Rights and Freedoms Generally
20. Declaration of Public Emergency
21. Interpretation and Savings
22. Establishment Of Office
23. Acting Governor-general
24. Oaths
25. Deputy to Governor-General
26. Public Seal
27. Establishment of Parliament
28. Composition of the Senate
29. Qualifications for Appointment as Senators
30. Disqualifications from Appointment as Senators
31. Tenure of Office of Senators
32. Appointment of Temporary Senators
33. President and Vice-president
34. Attendance of Attorney-general at Proceedings of Senate
35. Attendance at Proceedings of Senate of Ministers who are Members of the House
36. Composition of the House
37. Attendance at Proceedings of the House of Ministers who are Senators
38. Qualifications for Election as a Member of the House
39. Disqualifications from Election as a Member of the House
40. Election of Members of the House
41. Tenure of Seats of Members of the House
42. Speaker and Deputy Speaker
43. Clerks to Houses of Parliament and their Staffs
44. Determination of Questions of Membership
45. Unqualified Persons Sitting or Voting
46. Power to Make Laws
47. Alternation of this Constitution and Supreme Court Order
48. Oath of Allegiance by Members of Parliament
49. Presiding in Senate and House
50. Quorum
51. Voting
52. Mode of Exercising Legislative Power
Constitution Protection Discrimination Race 2022


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